NIGERIA, MOROCCO AGREES COMMENCING CONSTRUCTION OF JOINT GAS PIPELINE

NIGERIA, MOROCCO AGREES COMMENCING CONSTRUCTION OF JOINT GAS PIPELINE

NIGERIA, MOROCCO AGREES COMMENCING CONSTRUCTION OF JOINT GAS PIPELINE
 
Adedayo Osho, Field Editor
 
February 10, 2021, Abuja
 
Nigeria and Morocco have reaffirmed their commitment to the construction of a joint gas pipeline proposed since December 2016.
 
According to a report from the Royal Cabinet of Morocco, a telephone conversation between Morrocan King Mohammed VI and Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari on 31st of January, 2021, confirmed both country’s determination to ensure the materialization of the project "as soon as possible," in Buhari's words of assurance.
 
Benefiting more than 300 million Africans, the Nigeria-Morocco pipeline would supply Benin, Togo, Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, The Gambia, Senegal, Mauritania, and Morocco, connecting to faraway Spain in Europe, through the city of Cádiz.
 
Estimated at $25 billion, the 5,660-km pipeline is a product of an agreement between the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) and Morocco’s National Board of Hydrocarbons and Mines (ONHYM). The project is aimed at improving access to energy across West Africa, as well as facilitating gas exports to Europe, in turn boosting revenue base of both countries.
 
The Nigeria-Morocco gas pipeline has for few years been competing with the Nigeria-Algeria pipeline project, codenamed the Trans-Saharan pipeline. 
 
Nigeria seemed rather disinterested about the Nigeria-Algeria project due to security concerns, because the proposed route of the Trans-Saharan pipeline would be northern Nigeria, Niger, and to southern Algeria - regions known as breeding grounds for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb and the Islamic State in West Africa, otherwise known as Boko Haram.